Coolart

Author
Company
Released
Genres
Size
16.7 KB
Rating
2.83 / 5.00
(6 Reviews)
Board Count
5 / 17
Sort:
1432

Reviewer
OMG
Review Date
15 years, 2 months ago (Nov 24, 2007)
Review

Wow, a masterpiece of game design. Even if the FMV-like intro would hint toward a linear story-based game with little to no interaction, Coolart actually manages to deliver a full-fledged RPG. Choices and consequences, stats, tens of non-linear quests: fans of big and overwhelmingly complex games, rejoice! Coolart actually manages to improve its visual aspect too: some of the best graphical effects i've ever seen for a ZZT game: an animated waterfall, fully animated death scenes, a trial you can take part in to try to defend yourself, all in pure ASCII goodness! Now you're probably asking yourself if Coolart is too difficult to be played by the average not-so-used-to-RPG player? Indeed, the game might be daunting at first, but its beauty is also its flexibility: it can be played as a linear choose-your-own-adventure game or a choice-responsive RPG where NPCs are actually influenced by your dialogue choices and actions. There are context-sensitive sidequests, a day and night system which affect what the other characters are doing, not to mention the beautiful hunger and thirst system which add a touch of realism and more interactivity. This game use an incredibly complex compression algorythm which allowed the author to include some MBs of stuff into some dozens of KBs. Yeah, this might as well be one of the biggest games in ZZT history. And among the best ones too.

Rating
5.00 / 5.00
457
Reviewer
Ryan Ferneau
Review Date
19 years, 10 months ago (Apr 03, 2003)
Review

I think I see what you mean, Double Berry. Medieval Japan is all about gray rooms with porn and unobtainable guns. And let's not forget the cleverly altered game console names, or the smilies who are colored exactly like the player, or the "north-facing" houses that look like water reflections of the "south-facing" houses. Seriously, you could find more art in the toolkits the author used to make this "game". These Japanese role-playing games are weird, man. I can't believe they put this stuff on CD-ROM.

Rating
0.50 / 5.00
447
Reviewer
Anarchy
Review Date
19 years, 10 months ago (Mar 29, 2003)
Review

ryo,that's kinda long,doncha think?

anyways,this is quite good.darby's making good progress in his art skills.

so..yeah.it deserves more.

Rating
4.00 / 5.00
446

Reviewer
double berry
Review Date
19 years, 10 months ago (Mar 29, 2003)
Review

One of the most unique and thought-provoking games ever made, Coolart is a fascinating tale of religion, history, and superstition that ranks among the least-known underdogs of all time. The game is set in the 10th and 11th centuries AD, during the Heian period in Japan when Kyoto was known as Heiankyo. The game includes episodes drawn from a large body of tales, legends and illustrated literature produced during or after the Heian period. These vignettes are edited into interactive, experiental forms, to allow the user to realistically sense the worldview and lifestyle of an ancient time. The game was inspired by The Tales of Genji and similar Japanese folktales. Your character in the game is a no-name male traveler, an ordinary human being who is faced with opportunities, driven by desires, and is bound to die. Your actions determine your path through this world, and many reincarnations to come. You may meet troublemakers, and demons, enter Paradise or Hell, be reborn, and re-enact the story of a scholar who played the devil in a high-stakes game of backgammon. In addition to very well-drawn authentic backgrounds, the game includes an excellent database of over 400 screens of text and pictures that gives background information for the time and place where you are in the game.

Calling Coolart a "game" is a bit misleading-- you don't get to solve any elaborate puzzles in traditional point-and-click adventure sense. Any item you carry with you will be used automatically when the time comes, so you can't really get "stuck" in the game. Coolart is better described as an interactive story that lets you interact with the game world at your leisure, similar to choose-your-own-adventure books. And what a world it is. The designers spare no pretense, no illusion that this is a "politically correct" or "family" game. Heiankyo comes alive before your very eyes, with all the gory details and harrowing images that its inhabitants truly faced or believed. You will come across a dog eating a corpse's entrails, long-winded old farts, a monk leading a prayer meeting, kids playing ball in the streets, a maiden with an obscenely phallic tongue, and many more true-to-life characters. And when you get to the underworld (yes, you must die in this game. Several times, in fact), you will find hellish scenes populated with sharp-toothed demons and tormented souls that are so effective as to churn your stomach. These characters are drawn with vivid facial characteristics, a cross between the cartoons of medieval Japanese art and the exaggerations of modern Japanimation. The speaking voices are filled with personality, often taunting, teasing, or sexy. They all speak Japanese (in the ancient tongue, no less), but all speech is subtitled in English.

What makes Coolart truly remarkable is that as you enter the town and interact with its inhabitants, you have only two choices. You can, in your arrogance, remain as you are, a contemporary Japanese or American, for example. And you won't get very far. The structure of relations that are the real art of the work won't let you. It does not allow this nonchalance with meaning. A more interesting choice is to try and understand the world as it would have appeared to a person of the time. Then you start to make your decisions, when you meet the guard, or the priest, or the gambler, according to someone else's meaning making map of Kyoto, and indeed of the world. You work within the constraints the artists have placed in the matrix of relations that are the art of this work. The look and feel of it are just window dressing. They are not art, they are design. The art is the in the relations. Follow along the line of those relations, and you learn what it means to be in the world as the world appears from the point of view of Pure Land Buddhism.

As Roger Ebert concludes in his review, "There is the sense, illusory but seductive, that one could wander this world indefinitely. This is a wonderful game." This truly wonderful, delightfully twisted path to enlightenment is well worth the honor of being one of the few full CD-ROM games on the site (yes, that big zip file contains the whole CD). A must-have, especially for anyone looking for a mature, meditative game that is a far cry from today's superficial releases.

Rating
5.00 / 5.00
445

yup

Reviewer
develin
Review Date
19 years, 10 months ago (Mar 29, 2003)
Review

oh Sh*t darby derby barbie what ever his dam name is says the art is cool for gods sakes it is not frigging cool ITS NOT ART!!!!!!!!!!!!! just a few pointless boards one where a guy sells ammo you can't get any gems and if you cheat to get gems and buy ammo the guy gives you ammo Crappy!

Rating
0.00 / 5.00
368
Reviewer
_-_-GaMEfAtsourHerO-_-_
Review Date
19 years, 10 months ago (Mar 29, 2003)
Review

Ham... Yeah............. To began with, the game(ra)/copilation dosen't do the tite justice(...). This is only thing the about five boards long, and none of is actually kewl percy, but some of it is pretty nice. Since the is only a commotion of art, I can give this a very long revew, so all I have 2 say to Derby is, " quit!! Try not to be so dipresing. You shud us diffrint colors other than red and gray." He did use STK nicely, tho.

You can dance if you wanna, You can leave your freinds behind, But if your freinds don't dance and if they don't dance Well their No fends of mine...

'_-_-gaMEraisourHerO-_-_'

Rating
2.50 / 5.00

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